Fares vs. Wages Fares vs. Wages

How does your fare compare?

Train fares have been consistently rising faster than wages. Use our handy tool to calculate how your salary and train fare have changed over the years.



£
Please enter a number
£
Please enter a number

We don't store this information or even process it on our web server - all calculations are done through your browser.

Slide to compare the cost of your commute with the salary for your current job at the time.

Date years
In
The salary for your current job would have been
£
The fare for your current commute would have been
£

% of your annual salary!
Train fare change +%
Average salary change +%
RPI change +%
CPI change +%

RPI (Retail Price Index) The Retail Price Index is a measure of inflation published monthly. It has been discredited by the Office of National Statistics and the Government says “The Consumer Price Index (CPI) remains a better measure of inflation than the Retail Price Index (RPI). The RPI is no longer a National Statistic, and is thought to overstate the effect of inflation.” CPI (Consumer Price Index) CPI is a more recent measure of inflation, using a different formula and slightly different basket of retail goods and services from RPI. The Government says “The Consumer Price Index (CPI) remains a better measure of inflation than the Retail Price Index (RPI). The RPI is no longer a National Statistic, and is thought to overstate the effect of inflation.”
World Events

Fares are beating wages hands down

For most people train fares are now rising more than three times as fast as their wages. Many people are finding that fares cost such a huge proportion of their income they're having to seriously consider alternative ways to get to work, or even working in a different place.

Why is this?

Commuter fares are set by the Government and linked to the Retail Price Index or RPI. They're going up by more than inflation every year, and are over 20 percent higher than when the current Government came to power. They're particularly unfair for part-time workers, who have to pay full-time season ticket prices even if they're only travelling two or three days a week.

What can we do about it?

We're calling for the Government to stop using the outdated RPI and link fares to the Consumer Price Index instead, which independent research shows would be a much fairer way to set rail fares, and bring them in line with wages.

E-mail the Chancellor George Osborne, now.

This guy

Send an e-mail to Mr Osborne